College of Education and Human Development Statue

Celebrating Our Past. Transforming The Future.


This fall, the College of Education and Human Development will begin a year-long celebration of 50 years of excellence.

Throughout our history we have been charged with transforming and enriching lives through education and health. Created as a school for teachers, we are now a school for leaders.

We offer 21 undergraduate programs and more than 30 graduate programs across multiple emphasis areas.

Educators, sports professionals, business leaders, healthcare professionals. Whatever the industry, our graduates are game-changers. Our graduates transform lives.

About the College

We Teach Texas


We are proud to be one of 11 universities in the Texas A&M University System preparing educators for Texas school systems.

There are more than 10,000 Aggies working in Texas schools across 746 districts and 208 counties. Thanks to our excellence in teacher preparation, these Aggies will stay in the classrooms long after their peers.

Become a Teacher

Learn about the TAMUS initiative

Departments in the College of Education & Human Development

Business professionals meeting outside of a cubicle workspace.

EAHR develops educational leaders and improves practice through teaching, research and service.

Educational Psychology Teacher Painting Students

EPSY is home to a variety of interrelated disciplines and degree options focused on human development and well-being in educational and community contexts.

Health-kinesiology

HLKN is the largest academic department at Texas A&M University and generates over 98,000 credit hours and 203,000 (Modified) weighted student credit hours each year.

Teaching learning culture middle grades classroom

TLAC’s mission is to create experiences that advance teaching, research and service through the application of knowledge in the preparation and development of quality educators; placing high value on collaboration, diversity, critical thinking, and creativity.

Staff and Faculty Kudos

If you’ve had a great encounter with a College of Education and Human Development faculty or staff member, tell us about it! Nominate them here.

College of Education and Human Development

Strategic Plan

College of Education & Human Development Strategic Plan 2015-2020


Download a PDF of CEHD 2015-2020 Strategic Plan 12-1-14

In 2019, the College of Education and Human Development will celebrate its 50-year anniversary. In the last five decades, there has been substantial growth in the number and diversity of students, faculty, instructional programs, and research activities in the College. While there has been growth, the College vision of Transforming Lives with a focus on improving achievement and health outcomes for all has been a constant. To realize that mission we have remained steadfast in our commitment to prepare highly qualified professionals in areas of high need. We have conducted research that promotes the development and implementation of effective practice and policy. While recognizing our ongoing commitments and focus, there have been significant changes in the operations, funding, instructional activities, and opportunities in the last five years. These include:

  • Changes in funding that include decreased state-level support, elimination of restrictive student fees, and implementation of differential tuition and excellence fees that promote flexible use to support instructional programs.
  • University-wide efforts to benchmark academic departments’ performance on key areas of scholarly productivity, teaching outcomes and engagement.
  • Integration and expanded use of technology-mediated instruction to support on-campus and distance education.
  • Significant facility renovation and construction initiatives to support instructional and research activities.
  • Dramatic growth in the number of full-time academic professional track faculty, currently approximately 50% of total faculty in the College, to support student enrollment growth in undergraduate and Masters’ programs.
  • CEHD faculty and leadership participating in two of the six university Grand Challenges.
  • Development of two new Centers with large federal funding grants: Center for Translational Research on Aging and Longevity (CTRAL) and the Center for Research and Development of English Language and Literacy Acquisition (CRDELLA).
  • Development of a College office on Organization Development and Diversity Initiatives (ODDI) to support and assess climate, diversity, and equity issues of students, faculty, and staff.
  • Ten-fold increase in the number of undergraduate students participating in global education activities, approximately 550 students in the 2013-14 academic year.
  • In the last five years there has been a 25% increase in student enrollment with our fall 2014 enrollment of 6,700 students; further, this increase represents growth primarily in undergraduate and graduate professional degrees, e.g., M.Ed. and Ed.D.

Status of CEHD 2010-2015 Strategic Plan Goals

Goals were organized under four domains: undergraduate education; graduate education; research; and engagement. The following reflects a synopsis of each of the goals and associated assessment information:

Undergraduate Education:

  • Increase undergraduate (UG) diversity through improved recruitment and retention to 25% in five years.
    • Based on fall 2013 enrollment, ~27% of undergraduate students identify as racially/ethnically diverse with ~36% of FTIC UG students identifying as racially diverse.
  • Create a climate that fosters and supports retention of students from diverse backgrounds.
    • With the leadership of the ODDI office, support from the Byrne Student Success Center and enhanced availability of high impact learning experiences, 87% of FTIC students graduate from CEHD and no demographic differences in retention rates.

Graduate Education:

  • Prepare doctoral students for the professoriate.
    • Based on 2013 Chronicle of Higher Education surveys, there is significant variability in the percentage of our Ph.D. graduates entering academe; departments range from ~22% to 79%.
  • Create a climate that foster and supports the development of graduate students and faculty from diverse backgrounds.
    • In fall 2013, ~48% of graduate students come from racially and/or ethnically diverse backgrounds and that percentage has remained somewhat constant since 2010 with a two percent increase in Hispanic students (~17% of students) and a two percent decrease (~11% of students) in Black students.
    • Since 2010, there has been a loss of four Black faculty and an increase of one Hispanic faculty member. In the 2013-14 academic year, ~77% percent of the faculty self-identified as White.
    • Climate assessment surveys have been conducted with students and faculty and while generally positive, concerns and issues were noted and a variety of initiatives have been undertaken with the leadership of the ODDI.

Research:

  • Increase external funding:
    • While faculty, individuals and teams have been awarded significant federal and state awards, both 2014 S. News & World Report ranking information (CEHD ranked 36th in externally funded research) and Academic Analytics information (three of the four departments are at the 60th percentile or below in federal funding when compared to other universities) indicate significant room for improvement.
    • Moreover, 2014 Academic Analytics information indicates that with the exception of one department, the percentage of faculty who are Principal Investigators on federal grants is one-fourth that of other universities.
  • Increase faculty dissemination of findings in top-tier publications:
    • 2014 Academic Analytics information indicates that CEHD tenure-track faculty publish journal articles at rates comparable to faculties at research institutions. However, the citation rates per faculty member and per article are significantly less.

Engagement:

  • Support and enhance P-16 research and engagement initiatives:
    • As a result of a number of local, state and federal grant activities, the work of CEHD faculty has impacted instructional practices of teachers and learning opportunities for students in K-12 settings (e.g., research, evaluation and outreach activities of Education Research Center, CRDELLA, Center for Development and Diversity, STEM projects, among others).
    • TAMU is the largest University producer of teacher certificates in the state; in 2012-13, 1,034 teachers were certified.

As is evident in the previously noted synopsis, there has been significant activity and, in some cases, positive development on the 2010-15 strategic goals. Selection of future College-level strategic goals, reflects, in part, performance on the current goals, but more importantly, reflects the aspirations of the College to be among the best colleges of Education and Human Development among public U.S. universities. Further, development of the 2015-20 Strategic Plan for our College reflects our vision, contextual changes and the recognition that this five-year period represents the last quarter in the university’s effort to realize the goal of Vision 2020 to be a top ten public university.

 

CEHD Strategic Goals for 2015-20

As a prologue to the presentation on the proposed Strategic Plan goals for the College, the following were considerations that led to selection of these goals:

  • Goals reflect identified areas of College-wide development benchmarked to similar colleges at AAU and top-tier land-grant universities.
  • Proposed goals are aligned with and support University strategic initiatives to meet Vision 2020 and University-identified Grand Challenges.
  • In some cases, goals identified in the CEHD 2010-15 strategic plan were not retained because of realized progress.

Please note that the proposed goals do not represent all valued College-level initiatives or outcomes to meet CEHD’s mission of Transforming Lives. High-need and high impact college programs not specifically identified will continue to receive resources comparable to the previous five year allocation. The proposed goals reflect areas of CEHD development that will receive additional focused attention and resources. Further, the outcomes of individual programs also may have limited relationship with some select strategic goals (e.g., undergraduate teacher preparation programs to Goal 7 “Prepare research scholars for the professoriate”); however, all CEHD programs are aligned with one or more of the proposed CEHD strategic goals. Further, it is recognized that individual CEHD academic departments may have additional strategic goals.

 

The following is the list of proposed CEHD 2015–20 strategic goals:

  1. Goal 1: Generate, disseminate and apply new knowledge that supports improved practice and effective policy with a focus on University-identified Grand Challenge initiatives, e.g., STEM Education, achievement disparities, cyber-learning, and One Health.
  2. Goal 2: Manage student enrollment strategically with a particular focus on high-need fields and reflecting the demographic character of the state.
  3. Goal 3: Expand extramural grant and contract activities, with a particular focus on multi-disciplinary collaborative efforts.
  4. Goal 4: Prepare undergraduate students to engage in lifelong learning and lifelong health and wellness through instructional initiatives aligned with Aggies Commit to Transforming Lives.
  5. Goal 5: Enhance, recognize and reward diversity and a climate of inclusion, equity and respect for students, faculty, and staff.
  6. Goal 6: Engage in activities to articulate and promote College identity.
  7. Goal 7: Prepare research scholars for the professoriate.

The following tables outline proposed College-level strategies, tactics, responsible parties, indicators, and desired outcomes for each of the identified strategic goals.

 

CEHD Strategic Plan 2015-2020

Goal 1Goal 2Goal 3Goal 4Goal 5Goal 6Goal 7

GOAL 1: Generate, disseminate and apply new knowledge that supports improved practice and effective policy with a focus on University-identified Grand Challenge initiatives: STEM education, achievement disparities, cyber learning, and One Health.

Goal indicators:

  • Academic Analytics indicators:
  • Number of peer reviewed journal publications
  • Citations per faculty
  • Demonstrated impact in Grand Challenge areas: citation analysis with focus on Grand Challenge areas

Goal benchmarks:

  • Performance meets or exceeds aspirant peers of Academic Analytics in publication indicators
  • Evidence of impact on state and national practice and policy

Goal 1 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsible Party Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Establish a CEHD advisory team with faculty leadership (director of interdisciplinary initiatives) to provide support for strategic research initiatives

 

 

Assemble a core interdisciplinary advisory team comprised of faculty researchers and practitioners from each of the identified Grand Challenge areas

 

Office is established and an action plan is developed
Identify and catalog research, outreach and other scholarly activities organized by strands that include the areas of STEM education, achievement disparities, cyber learning, and health

 

 

Using 2015-2016 baseline year, number of views increases by 25% annually thereafter
Provide personnel resources (e.g., faculty, doctoral students, staff) to assist with communication efforts to stakeholders

 

25% increase in the number of press releases at the end of year 1 and 20% annually thereafter
Develop research and outreach liaison to support PIs Research collaborations and school partnerships increased by 20% after year 2 of implementation and 50% after year 5
S2. Provide College level recognition incentives

 

Establish annual recognition of faculty who make significant research and outreach efforts

 

Department heads

 

Faculty with significant research and/or outreach activities identified and selected by committee of peers 20% annual increase in number of CEHD faculty involved in a CEHD strategic research initiatives

 

Department-level awards (e.g., course release, summer support, stipend, plaque, service points on A-1, etc.) for faculty who make substantive contributions to CEHD’s strategic research initiatives

 

Department heads Department-level awards in place by end of 2015-2016 academic year All four CEHD departments to have institutionalized research and outreach awards by end of 2015-16 academic year

 

Annual report of department awards to be submitted to the dean’s office beginning fall 2016

S3. Strengthen impact of CEHD scholarship through increased publications and subsequent citations in top-tier journals for their respective disciplines Provide CEHD faculty with list of journals indexed in Academic Analytics and add field to A-1 reporting system to accurately track indexed publications

 

Set minimum expectations for faculty publications in reputable   journals relative to their discipline

Department heads, Instructional Technology, CEHD data management office

Department heads

 

List is disseminated and made available on departmental and College websites

List of journal articles published, accepted, or in press

Top five Land Grant status

CEHD ranked among the top 10 public colleges of education

Increase in number of publications in top peer-reviewed journals

 

 

 

 

GOAL 2: Manage student enrollment strategically with a particular focus on high-need fields and reflecting the demographic character of the state

Goal indicators:

  • Number and percent of student recruitment, retention and graduation rates by degree program, disaggregated by race and ethnicity
  • Growth in identified high need professional certificate program

Goal benchmarks:

  • Performance meets or exceeds AAU publics and select aspirant peers

Goal 2 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsibility Party Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Identify undergraduate, masters, Ed.D., and Ph.D. programs where growth can and should occur, and programs where enrollment should remain constant

 

Complete a template for each degree program including:

1.     Historical enrollment (CEHD provides)

2.     Job market demand and need for graduates in area (Program completes)

3.     Performance relative to peers or national standards (Program completes)

4.     Alignment with CEHD and TAMU strategic goals (Program completes)

·       Information presented to Department Heads, Dean, and Academic Affairs deans, who collectively set priorities for growth.

S1.1. Office of Academic Affairs

 

S1.2–1.4: Department heads and programs

Presentation: Department heads, dean, Office of Academic Affairs

 

Completion of exercise

Submissions of reports to CEHD leadership

 

 

 

Benchmarks generated by departments
S2. Support recruitment, retention, and graduation goals that are aligned with S1.

 

 

Based on results from Activity #1, develop comprehensive recruiting, retention and graduation plan to include management and evaluation activities

 

Office of Academic Affairs, departments Recruitment plan in place Student body demographics consistent with goals
S3. Recruit undergraduate

and graduate students to match the demographic character of the State

Evaluate current recruitment plan, with an emphasis on attracting students who are racially diverse, first generation status, and/or come from economically disadvantaged high schools; based on efficacy of current plans and best practices, develop comprehensive recruitment plan

 

Other Activities

Set CEHD process for PhD admissions, with feedback from departments and Department Heads

·       Examine faculty to student ratio, seeking to mirror peers

 

Office of Academic Affairs Recruitment plan in place Undergraduate and graduate programs that are demographically representative of the State

 

GOAL 3: Expand extramural grant and contract activities, with a particular focus on multi-disciplinary collaborative efforts.

Goal indicators:

  • Academic Analytics:
  • Total federal grant dollars
  • Total dollars per faculty
  • Percent of faculty with external funding
  • S. News & World Report:
  • Total extramural dollars
  • Total extramural dollars per faculty
  • Coordinating Board 18 Characteristics of Doctoral Programs

Goal benchmarks:

  • Performance meets or exceeds aspirant peers in Academic Analytics
  • Top 20 public as reflected in S. News & World Report indicators

Goal 3 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsible

Party

Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Strategically recruit and retain well-funded, highly productive scholars in each department Priority faculty recruitment will reflect strategic goals 1 and 2 and emphasize cross departmental, College, and university engagement Top ten public colleges of education on associated indicators
S2. Establish incentive program for extramural funding for contracts and grants Departments make grant submissions a tenure-track faculty expectation, if not in place already Top ten public colleges of education on associated indicators for percent of faculty with a grant
S3. Provide support for faculty who support colleagues in proposal review and development Formalize incentive plan within departments (e.g., administrative release; merit; stipend); require formal plan for process with each case

 

Explore hiring outside consultants to review grants prior to submission

S4. Ensure tenured and tenure track faculty have the expectation to actively pursue and secure grant and contract funding Departments revise A-1 to make grant activity a pre-requisite for being meritorious in research activities

GOAL 4: Prepare undergraduate students to engage in lifelong learning and lifelong health and wellness through Aggies Commit to Transforming Lives.

Goal indicators:

  • Annual survey of undergraduate students regarding participation and quality of high impact learning experiences
  • Department head report on faculty participation and quality of high impact learning experiences

Goal benchmarks:

  • 100% of undergraduate students engaged in five or more high impact learning activities
  • Associate dean and heads report that 100% of high impact learning experiences are deemed of high quality

Goal 4 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsible Party Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Institutionalize Aggies Commit to Transforming Lives through faculty incentives, recognition, and curricular changes

 

Institutionalize the Aggies Commit to Transforming Lives by imbedding high-impact learning experiences in the undergraduate and graduate curriculum

 

Office of Academic Affairs, departments, program faculty Identification of high impact learning experiences in curriculum All CEHD programs are engaged in five or more high impact learning activities
Institutionalize the Aggies Commit to Transforming Lives faculty fellows and administrative fellows

 

Office of Academic Affairs and program faculty Undergraduate student participation in:

·       Research

·       Global education

·       Peer mentoring

All CEHD programs are engaged in five or more high impact learning activities
Include Aggies Commit activities on departmental A-1

 

Department heads

 

Aggies Commit activities included

in A-1

Increased faculty participation in Aggies Commit activities
S2. Support from Academic Affairs dean’s office for departments’ engagement in Aggies Commit initiatives Academic Affairs Office will allocate fiscal resources and orchestrate programmatic support for Aggies Commit initiatives in departments

 

 

Office of Academic Affairs and program coordinators

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of students participating in Aggies Commit activities; quality of the experiences

 

All CEHD programs are engaged in five or more high impact learning activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

In collaboration with departments, Academic Affairs Office will establish expectations and support evaluative activities associated with Aggies Commit initiatives

 

Office of Academic Affairs Presence of effective assessment of Aggies Commit activities, including continual improvement Previous assessment. Continual improvement
S3. Develop alumni contact and update system to better track outcomes of our lifelong learner graduates and continue their engagement in Aggie Commit programs

 

 

Obtain additional information upon graduation so that additional contacts can be made (e.g., CEHD Alumni Association). Link graduates to CEHD and department social media College development office, departments, career center Development of an alumni tracking system Track life-long learning, as measured by departmental outcomes; development of CEHD alumni network

GOAL 5: Enhance, recognize and reward diversity and a climate of inclusion, equity and respect for students, faculty, and staff.

Goal indicators:

  • Faculty, student and staff surveys (surveys of current CEHD community and exit surveys for departing faculty, student and staff)
  • Greater than 90% have a positive evaluation pertaining to climate, diversity and equity

Goal benchmarks:

  • A positive perception of a climate of inclusion, equity and respect by students, faculty, staff and administrators
  • Faculty and student demographics, as defined in the Diversity Accountability Report, that meet or exceed our peer institutions
  • Staff demographics, related to race, ethnicity and gender, meet or exceed Brazos Valley census data.

Goal 5 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsible Party Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Evaluate CEHD organization units (departments and College) on climate, diversity, and equity

 

 

 

Annual evaluative feedback from staff and faculty related to climate, diversity and equity including bi-annual evaluations, focus groups, and departmental reporting ODDI oversee evaluation activities

 

Improvements in previously identified problem areas (gender, power, sexual orientation, religion)

 

Report to Dean

Less than 5% reporting of incidents by respondents for each area
Provide ongoing review of climate and diversity data

 

Climate survey: CoDI subcommittee on Evaluation and Sustainability with support from departmental climate and diversity committees

 

Staff Exit Interviews: Dean’s office HR liaison, Assistant Dean for Organization Development and Diversity Initiatives

 

 

 

Improvements in staff retention, climate and diversity

 

Report to Dean

Less than 5% leaving due to reported diversity or climate concerns
S2. Conduct College-wide professional development programs for faculty, students, staff and administrators to support ODDI initiatives Develop recommendations, action plan and implementation strategies from CEHD equity white papers (equity, climate, etc.)

 

CoDI subcommittee on Education and Trust building Alignment of recommendations and needs based upon equity white paper, data on inequities addressed/aligned Implement action plan to address equity areas identified in spring 2014 Equity White Paper
Create ad hoc committee (n=3; faculty, staff and graduate student) in each department to develop a report related to evaluation system and proposed actions from the equity white paper that would be departmentally focused. Present in meeting 1, ideas put to vote in second meeting

 

Departmental climate and diversity committees, department heads Departmental climate and diversity participation (meetings, data, implementation of initiatives) Create committee by September, development of system by end of fall, implementation of system beginning spring 2015
Establish leadership development institute in the areas of climate, diversity, and equity

 

CEHD Critical Dialogues in Higher Education (CDHE) group CEHD Critical Dialogue Summer Leadership Institute (CDSLI) summer 2015

 

TAMU Difficult Dialogues Summer Institute (DDSI) summer 2016

Faculty and staff search committee and tenure and promotion workshops on implicit bias and cognitive errors

 

 

 

Office of Faculty Affairs and ODDI

 

 

 

 

Increase in hires of diverse faculty, staff, and administrators
Provide support to department search committees and department/College T&P Committees on processes and minimizing cognitive errors

 

Office of Faculty Affairs, CoDI sub-committee on Education and Trust Building and ODDI Include checklist on diversity for search committees Increased diverse hires
Conduct annual CEHD Climate Matters conference

 

ODDI and CoDI Conference planning committee with participants from each department Topics address climate issues identified in survey

 

Growth in participants, diversity

 

Conference survey data

 

Continued growth of conference

 

College constituents see link between conference and improving climate issues through survey evaluations

Expand CEHD’s Difficult Dialogues Program (DDP) – DDP Modules, Quarterly Dialogues, Critical Dialogue Summer Leadership Institute Critical Dialogues in Higher Education committee (CDHE) Target participants for DDP modules/

completion of DDP modules

 

Diverse and broad engagement in quarterly dialogues

 

100% deans and department heads and majority of faculty and staff have completed DDP modules
S3. Recognize faculty, staff, students and administrators with College climate and diversity awards for excellence in positively contributing to the CEHD climate Survey existing departmental awards CoDI ad hoc committee Report to ODDI Dean Report of all CEHD awards
Generate award criteria for College level awards

 

CoDI Subcommittee on Leadership

 

Criteria linked to climate, diversity and equity.

 

Report to CoDI

Implement CEHD climate awards program
Develop departmental awards in collaboration and communication with ODDI CoDI and depart-mental climate and diversity committees with department heads Nominations

 

Report to ODDI

Increase in number of climate and diversity awards in CEHD departments

 

 

GOAL 6: Engage in activities to articulate and promote a shared College identity.

Goal indicators:

  • Survey all internal and external College communication regarding presence of College affiliation information
  • Student surveys upon entering and graduation

Goal benchmarks:

  • 100% of electronic, hard-copy and signage provides College identification information
  • Survey of internal stakeholders indicates 90% understanding of College mission and impact
  • Survey of external stakeholders indicates 75% understanding of College mission and impact

Goal 6 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsible Party Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Review and evaluate College and departmental communications practices and personnel creating a unified communication plan

 

·   Seek input and feedback from leadership team regarding communications needs

·   Review information and provide suggestions and feedback to dean

·   Complete a signage, publication and web site review regarding branding and correcting or replacing as appropriate

 

Communications Manager

 

Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration

Feedback surveys

Review of signage

Identification of the College of Education and Human Development in all College facilities and with all print and electronic publication

 

Seek input and feedback from leadership team regarding communications needs

 

S2. Characterize College Identity

 

·       Develop area research profile

·       Develop program area profiles

·       Identify themes of importance in research and program areas of CEHD by creating linkages from the data collected in Goals 1 and 2 from the profiles completed

 

 

Goal 1 group

Goal 2 group

Leadership Team

Feedback surveys College level themes of what is important to the College of Education and Human Development

 

Demonstration of those themes to internal and external constituents

 

Ability of constituents to relate to the College and to the themes of importance

S3. Create a College promotion plan ·  Development and implement college marketing media

·  Highlight the signature areas or linkages established on the Web

·  Determine other products including print materials

 

Communications group Revision of communication products (e.g., printed publications, websites, social media) A five year college communications plan to guide publications and web presence

 

GOAL 7: Prepare research scholars for the professoriate.

Goal indicators:

  • Number and percentage of Ph.D. graduates entering post-doc/professoriate, noting type of institution of higher education

Goal benchmarks:

  • Performance meets or exceeds AAU land-grant/aspirant peers

Goal 7 Benchmark Info

Strategies Tactics Responsible

Party

Indicators Desired Outcomes
S1. Expand resources and support to facilitate doctoral students establishing and maintaining a prolific academic writing habit

 

 

 

 

Increase support for POWER (Promoting Outstanding Writing for Excellence in Research) studios and writing course initiatives based on the POWER writing model (and offered by facilitators training by the POWER leadership)

 

 

Deans and department heads

 

POWER leadership

 

Increase in number of POWER BASIC and ADVANCED writing studio offerings. Increase frequency of offers for CEHD 603 (as needed)

 

Numbers of students participating in POWER BASIC and ADVANCED writing studios will increase by 20% beginning in fall 2015 (using fall 2014 as a baseline)

 

Number of students taking the CEHD 603 writing course will increase by 15% (based on 2014 as a baseline)

Ensure that CEHD graduate students have priority access to POWER writing studio enrollment (both BASIC and ADVANCED studios)

 

POWER Leadership Increased enrollment of CEHD students attending BASIC and ADVANCED POWER writing studios All graduate students in CEHD having the opportunity to attend BASIC and/or ADVANCED POWER writing studios
POWER representatives available to visit relevant doctoral seminars/ classes

 

POWER Leadership Doctoral students receive information about POWER opportunities early in their program of study All graduate students in CEHD will be able to describe the services offered by POWER and how to access them

 

S2. Alignment of departmental faculty expectation with Ph.D. student performance expectations Ensure that each department’s A-1 process evaluates/ reinforces faculty for involving students as coauthors on publications

 

 

Include review of doctoral students’ progress in faculty annual review

 

Department heads

Department heads

A-1 forms modified by October 2015 for faculty input of 2014 A-1 data

 

A-1 forms modified in 2015 for implementation in spring 2016

Using data from 2014 A-1s as a baseline, the number of faculty publications with graduate student coauthors will increase by 20% year thereafter

 

100% completion of doctoral student review

S3. Institute a program to increase doctoral students’ knowledge and skills in grant writing

 

Establish planning committee of 4-6 faculty with review experience and/or funding from some of the major agencies (e.g., NIH, NSF, IES, DOE) to develop idea and structure of a doctoral seminar

 

CEHD Office of Research (establishes committee)

Committee (develops ideas/structure of seminar)

Committee holds first meeting during spring 2015 semester

 

 

Recommendations for proposed seminar structure submitted by May 2015

Course offered during 2015-2016 academic year (or summer 2016)

 

By 2018, all CEHD students graduating with a Ph.D. will have participated in one or more grant-writing seminars

Develop college-wide grant seminars available to doctoral students to cover the structure and essential elements of some of the major funding agencies

 

CEHD Offices of Academic Affairs and Research

 

Instructor(s) identified

 

Seminar added to 2015-2016 schedule of course offerings

 

Syllabus finalized

By 2018, all CEHD students graduating with a Ph.D. will have participated in one or more grant-writing seminars
Reward and recognize faculty who participate in the development and delivery of grant writing seminars. (e.g., stipend, professional development resources, A-1 credit, public recognition.)

 

CEHD deans and department heads Instructor(s) identified

 

Seminar added to 2015-2016 schedule of course offerings

 

By 2018, all CEHD students graduating with a Ph.D. will have participated in one or more grant-writing seminars
S4. Promote greater faculty support for mentoring doctoral students

 

Recognize faculty with strong evidence of mentoring (publishing with students, involving students in grant activities, student awards, placement of students at research universities, etc.)

 

Department heads and CEHD Office of Faculty Affairs

 

Department-level awards/acknowledgements presented at end of 2014-15 academic year

 

Two College-level graduate student mentorship awards established and presented during fall 2015 awards dinner

Increased numbers of CEHD graduate student:

· publications in peer-reviewed outlets

· involvement in grant activities

· placements in professorial positions

Provide recognized faculty with travel stipends (i.e., up to $1,000) and/or match funding for student travel

 

Department heads and CEHD Office of Faculty Affairs

 

Department-level awards/acknowledgements presented at end of 2014-15 academic year

 

Two College-level graduate student mentorship awards established and presented during fall 2015 awards dinner

Increased numbers of CEHD graduate student:

· publications in peer-reviewed outlets

· involvement in grant activities

· placements in professorial positions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Departments examine their evaluation and reward structure to reduce potential disincentives for faculty mentoring

 

Department heads Department-level awards/acknowledgements presented at end of 2014-15 academic year

 

Two College-level graduate student mentorship awards established and presented during fall 2015 awards dinner

Increased numbers of CEHD graduate student:

· publications in peer-reviewed outlets involvement in grant activities

· placements in professorial positions

S5. Add College- level teaching as part of Ph.D. programs (where appropriate)

 

Convene doctoral program chairs across the College to (a) determine programs that already have such a requirement and how they are structured; (b) share process and evaluation tools currently in use, and (c) discuss potential barriers and corresponding solutions to adding this requirement

 

 

Office of Academic Affairs Committee convened during spring 2015 semester

 

Written summary of findings and recommendations submitted to Dean’s executive committee by end of spring 2015

Number of doctoral students completing college teaching experiences/ competencies will increase by 20% over the five-year period
S6. Enhance research methodological expertise of students in Ph.D. programs

 

Conduct a survey of doctoral programs’ current research and statistical methods requirements (coursework and required competencies)

 

Office of Academic Affairs Survey data summarized and shared with GIC and all doctoral program chairs Increase in research and statistical methods requirements (coursework & required competencies) as evidenced when comparing original and updated requirements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Analyze survey findings to determine areas of strengths and potential areas for improvement

 

Committee of doctoral program chairs Summary of strengths and areas for improvement submitted to GIC
Identify existing courses/structures currently available in the College and disseminate across doctoral programs Office of Academic Affairs Information disseminated to departments, and doctoral program chairs
Programs consider and submit any updates to their doctoral requirements in this area Doctoral program chairs and department heads Updated doctoral programs’ research and statistical methods requirements (coursework & required competencies) on file with CEHD Office of Graduate Studies
S7. Track student publication activity after graduation Request students complete a Google Scholar page Department heads Database of student publications five years after graduation CEHD doctoral graduates among most highly cited in their fields

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