College of Education and Human Development Statue

COVID-19 Updates and Guidance


Our top priority during this time is to ensure the safety of our students, faculty and staff. Review our FAQs and stay updated.

CEHD Updates & FAQs

We will continue to update information as it comes available.

Throughout our history we have been charged with transforming and enriching lives through education and health. Created as a school for teachers, we are now a school for leaders.

We offer 21 undergraduate programs and more than 30 graduate programs across multiple emphasis areas.

Educators, sports professionals, business leaders, healthcare professionals. Whatever the industry, our graduates are game-changers. Our graduates transform lives.

We Teach Texas


We are proud to be one of 11 universities in the Texas A&M University System preparing educators for Texas school systems.

There are more than 10,000 Aggies working in Texas schools across 746 districts and 208 counties. Thanks to our excellence in teacher preparation, these Aggies will stay in the classrooms long after their peers.

Become a Teacher

Learn about the TAMUS initiative

Departments in the College of Education & Human Development

Business professionals meeting outside of a cubicle workspace.

EAHR develops educational leaders and improves practice through teaching, research and service.

Educational Psychology Teacher Painting Students

EPSY is home to a variety of interrelated disciplines and degree options focused on human development and well-being in educational and community contexts.

Health-kinesiology

HLKN is the largest academic department at Texas A&M University and generates over 98,000 credit hours and 203,000 (Modified) weighted student credit hours each year.

Teaching learning culture middle grades classroom

TLAC’s mission is to create experiences that advance teaching, research and service through the application of knowledge in the preparation and development of quality educators; placing high value on collaboration, diversity, critical thinking, and creativity.

Staff and Faculty Kudos

If you’ve had a great encounter with a College of Education and Human Development faculty or staff member, tell us about it! Nominate them here.

Fish Oil May Help Improve Mood In Veterans

Fish Oil May Help Improve Mood In Veterans
September 13, 2016 CEHD Communications
0000

Fish Oil May Help Improve Mood In Veterans


New research has revealed that low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat. The study was conducted by Major Nicholas Barringer, PhD when he was a doctoral student under the direction of HLKN professor and department head Dr. Richard Kreider, in collaboration with several current and former members of the US Army, and colleagues at Texas A&M University.

The study originated from research conducted by Colonel Mike Lewis, MD who examined Omega-3 fatty acid levels of soldiers who committed suicide compared to non-suicide control and found lower Omega-3 levels in the blood was associated with increased risk of being in the suicide group.

In conjunction with Dr. Lewis’ research, Drs. Kreider and Barringer (now an assistant professor in nutrition at Baylor University) worked with 100 soldiers at Fort Hood to identify which factors affected moods in returning soldiers.

“We looked at how physical activity levels and performance measures were related to mood state and resiliency,” Dr. Kreider said.

Fish oil contains Omega-3 fatty acids that help in boost brain function. Studies also show that fish oil acts as an anti-inflammatory within the body — helping athletes and soldiers manage intense training better. Fish oil content is especially important for soldiers due to the consistent training and physical regiments performed in and out of combat and risk to traumatic brain injury.

“What we found was the decrease in physical activity and the concentration of fish oil and Omega-3s in the blood were all associated with resiliency and mood,” Dr. Kreider said.

Dr. Barringer believes it to be a significant forward step toward addressing some of the issues many soldiers face.

“The mental health of our service members is a serious concern and it is exciting to consider that appropriate diet and exercise might have a direct impact on improving resiliency,” Dr. Barringer said.

In order to properly measure soldiers physically, Drs. Kreider and Barringer developed a formula that has the potential to assist in effectively screening soldiers with potential PTSD ahead of time. The formula measures a number of factors including: fitness and psychometric assessments, physical activity, and additional analysis.

“By improving resiliency in service members, we can potentially decrease the risk of mental health issues,” Dr. Barringer said. “Early identification can potentially decrease the risk of negative outcomes for our active service members as well as our separated and retired military veterans.”

The military is using some of our exercise, nutrition, and performance related work and the findings may help identify soldiers at risk to depression when they return from combat tours, Dr. Kreider said. He believes that by working to identify such high-risk issues faced by soldiers, it can set a precedent that will benefit not only military leadership, but also the general public.

“The public must realize that our soldiers need support before, during, and after their service,” Dr. Kreider said. “There needs to be a time for soldiers to transition, become re-engaged within a community, and stay engaged in that community.”

More information regarding fish oil and other exercise and nutrition related research can be found at the Exercise & Sport Nutrition Lab’s website.

Written by Justin Ikpo (cehdcomm@tamu.edu)


For media inquiries, contact Ashley Green.

Fundraising


To learn more about how you can assist in fundraising, contact Jody Ford ’99, Sr. Director of Development jford@txamfoundation.com or 979-847-8655

Recent Posts


Can't find what you are looking for?

Contact CEHD
Translate »